Another in the Music Series.

Sep. 20th, 2017 09:32 pm
pink_halen: (Default)
[personal profile] pink_halen
This is how you get a Head.

You may ask

Same as it ever was!

Excellent timing

Sep. 20th, 2017 05:22 pm
christopher575: (Default)
[personal profile] christopher575
I'm curious about how the ferry terminal project will play out week-by-week, so I wanted to go down today even though there was a big detour due to emergency road repair. And since we got a locking mailbox and can no longer leave outgoing mail in it, I brought along a DVD for Netflix with a plan to take an even longer route home and drop it off at the Mukilteo post office. A lot can change in a week!

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The Busy Day Off

Sep. 20th, 2017 08:15 pm
kybearfuzz: (Bill the Cat)
[personal profile] kybearfuzz
I took the day off from work since I had a lot of things happening.

First, I had a doctor's appointment with the orthopedist this morning. She took a look at my foot and said I could leave the boot off. I told her that I had taken a few steps without the boot and just had a slight ache from using muscles that had been locked up for a while, but she told me that was normal. She said that in the future, if I started having this pain again, that I didn't need to see her, just use the boot again for a week. It's certainly strange to have a doctor tell me not to come see them, but it makes sense.

I've noticed that my foot has been sore today. I've backed off the ibuprofen because I'm sure my system is sick of it, but I caved tonight before I go to bed.

When I got home, I had a few hours before the cable guy was to show up, so I decided to clean out the car. I cleaned the windows, had Armour All wipes for the dashboard, and brought out the vacuum cleaner to get cloth free of lint and stuff.

There was a bit of time to rest before the cable guy showed. He was a nice ginger cubby named Ben. I tried to sneak a pic, but he was pretty alert. I showed him the severed cable and he agreed that the door installer was an idiot. It took him a whole five minutes to fix it. Since he was here, he checked the cable boxes outside the house for some routine maintenance. There was supposed to be a separate work order (second cable guy) to come and put in a cable line in my spare bedroom, but he never showed. The cable company said that there was no second order, though Ben found it on his tablet, so I'm not sure what happened. They said I'd need a second cable box for the house and it just seemed like too much trouble for the spare bedroom, so I canceled it, since it didn't appear to be happening anyway.

I'll be back at work tomorrow, no boot, so I hope my feet will hold up.

Groups vs systems

Sep. 20th, 2017 10:13 am
dpolicar: (Default)
[personal profile] dpolicar
I am so very tired of the narrative of "We shouldn't condemn a whole group because of some bad individuals. There are good people and bad people in that group."

Here's the thing: there's a difference between a group of people and a system of people. The difference is that a system of people comprises not only the individuals, but also the social constructs that guide the behavior of those individuals... in other words, the system itself.

For example, a company isn't just a bunch of people who coincidentally happen to work on the same projects in distributed ways. A school system isn't a bunch of teachers and administrators who independently happen to work the same way. A police precinct isn't a bunch of officers who just happen to follow the same rules.

In each of these cases there are policies and guidelines and hierarchies and informal structures and so forth that shape behavior. There's a system.

And when we praise or condemn the public school system, or the police, or Microsoft, or etc. we mostly aren't praising or condemning a whole group because of some good or bad individuals. I mean, sure, those individuals exist, but they aren't the reason. We are praising/condemning a whole group because of the system that organizes it. And the larger the system we're talking about, the more true that is: when we say that democracies are more just than totalitarian states, or that capitalism is more efficient than communism, or that communism is more humane than capitalism, or various other claims along those lines, we're basically not saying anything at all about any individual.

Or at least, that's how it should be. I mean, sure, sometimes we praise or condemn a group of people just because we're applying aggregate-level stereotypes to all the individuals in that group. And in those cases the "We shouldn't condemn a whole group because of some bad individuals. There are good people and bad people in that group." narrative makes sense: we really shouldn't! Or at least, we're overwhelmingly likely to be mistaken when we do; we can draw our own ethical conclusions from there.

(I am reminded now of a friendship I broke some time back by expressing both the idea that condemning individuals because of their group affiliations is bad, and the idea that analyzing the common behaviors of individuals is the only way we can identify pathological systems, in ways that struck them as infuriatingly and relationship-endingly hypocritical.)

And sure, sometimes we make analysis errors in this space. Sometimes there's a system operating we're unaware of. Sometimes we infer the presence of systems that don't actually operate, or aren't relevant to what we're talking about. It's easy to talk about the behavior of people while ignoring the systems that shape us, and it's easy to handwave about notional systems without actually making any concrete or testable claims about whether they exist.

I'm not saying I expect us to be perfectly accurate when we describe groups and systems. But I want us to be better about acknowledging that they are two different things.

When someone condemns racism as a systemic attribute of a society, for example, there are folks who reply that no, racism is a property of individuals, end-of-story.

And in principle that can be a legitimate disagreement; if someone wants to argue that there really aren't any social systems underlying/guiding/constraining/coordinating the racist behavior of individuals, for example, that's a totally relevant argument. (Mind you, I think it's obviously false, but that's another matter.)

But usually they aren't arguing that; rather, they are simply insisting that we can only talk about individuals, because when we say that racism is also demonstrated through the systems that essentially all white people in this country participate in, we're talking about a whole group, and (all together now) "we shouldn't condemn a whole group because of some bad individuals. There are good people and bad people in that group."

And I don't know how to say all of this, or any of it, in ways that are at all useful within the conversation itself. And I watch other people trying to do it, and not getting very far either.

And I understand that often that's because other people just don't want to hear it, and in general I don't believe that there's a way to say everything that will be accepted by the person I'm talking to and that it's my job to find it. But still, I try to express myself clearly and compellingly.

So, anyway. I am so very tired of the narrative of "We shouldn't condemn a whole group because of some bad individuals. There are good people and bad people in that group."

Aye Matey!

Sep. 19th, 2017 08:23 pm
pink_halen: (Default)
[personal profile] pink_halen
Avast. Did Ye know September 19th is Talk Like A Pirate Day?

We Pirates are getting Old so Consult this Aye Chart to see if ye still has it!

PirateEyeChart

Swimmingly

Sep. 19th, 2017 06:58 pm
christopher575: (Default)
[personal profile] christopher575
It was so nice to be able to go to the pool again today! The main road that runs past the park is down to one lane for repairs, so I just avoided it completely. There's a back way in if you park in the neighborhood behind the park, which is handy, but it's a longer walk. Not a big deal at all, unless you get most of the way to the building and realize you didn't bring a lock from the car. So, a little extra walking. And time. It was nice, though.

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(no subject)

Sep. 19th, 2017 04:14 pm
bitterlawngnome: (Default)
[personal profile] bitterlawngnome


Budapest / Bullet Holes; 6774
© Bill Pusztai 2017

(no subject)

Sep. 19th, 2017 11:41 am
bitterlawngnome: (Default)
[personal profile] bitterlawngnome


from the train window between Munich and Saltzberg; 6553
© Bill Pusztai 2017


from the train window between Munich and Saltzberg; 6629
© Bill Pusztai 2017


from the train window between Munich and Saltzberg; 6722
© Bill Pusztai 2017

Help out Allen

Sep. 18th, 2017 10:40 pm

As good a time as any

Sep. 18th, 2017 03:56 pm
christopher575: (Default)
[personal profile] christopher575
We're entering the time of year when there's not so much to see during the first part of any walk, because it's just too dark. And there are fewer flowers so there won't be as much close-up photography, either. Judging by all the leaves that seemed to fall practically overnight, I'm also curious if there will be much of autumn. Guess we'll see. The point being, if my Podo had to go missing, now's not the worst time. Even if there was a way to delay the start of a time lapse, that doesn't make up for the shorter amount of daylight once the sun comes up. With that in mind, I'm not going to rush to replace the Podo. I've got LASIK payments to make and a very long tattoo backlog, so my money's always spoken for before I even have it.

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dpolicar: (Default)
[personal profile] dpolicar
(A comment from another discussion)

I acknowledge, of course, that we are all imperfect humans, and what an individual officer does in a specfic situation is always the result of a million variables that are impossible to predict and often impossible to determine after the fact.

That's why I tend to focus more on training and evaluation protocols than on specific events. It's unjust to expect officers to do X in a sitution if they've been trained to do Y, but it's perfectly reasonable to expect officers to be trained to do X if we prefer that they do X in a situation.

I would prefer that police be trained and evaluated as peacekeepers rather than killers. So I would prefer, for example, they be trained and expected to identify situations that don't require a death, and to act so as to not create a death where none is required.

That said, how police are trained and evaluated is a collective decision, and if we collectively prefer police to choose deaths that aren't required -- for example, if we prefer to train and equip police as military officers who happen to deploy among civilian populations -- then that's how we should train and evaluate them, regardless of my preferences. That's part of the price I pay for living in a collective.

If police _are_ trained to choose unnecessary deaths, we should (individually and collectively) treat calling the police, permitting them into our homes, and otherwise making use of their services as a use of deadly force. Consequently, if we don't individually endorse the use of deadly force in those situations, we should not call the police, any more than we would fire a gun.

Those are individual decisions, not collective ones, and it's perfectly reasonable to hold one another as individuals accountable for them.

I acknowledge that this means that individuals who eschew deadly force in a situation may find themselves in conflict with any police who may arrive. I don't like this, and I don't endorse it, but I acknowledge it.

Cooking (and such)

Sep. 18th, 2017 12:10 am
dr_tectonic: (füd)
[personal profile] dr_tectonic
I'm working on a post about the wedding reception, but I did a bunch of cooking this weekend.

Yesterday, after some weapons training in the morning, I got over to the Westminster Farmer's Market (72nd & Sheridan) and discovered that they have a stand from a farm that will let you fill a big bag with whatever produce you want for $10. AND that they take cash, check, or credit card! Hooray for little credit card readers that plug into a smartphone! (I only wish I'd thought to ask before I spent 15 minutes looking for the phantom 7-11 across the street that supposedly one had a credit union ATM in it but no longer exists.) That plus regular grocery shopping netted me a bunch of things to cook.

I got a bunch of mini eggplants, which I roasted and turned into traditional Romanian eggplant salad (salata de vinete, I guess?). It's more of a puree or dip. Unusual flavor profile. Tasty, but not sure it's worth the substantial amount of work involved. It might want less flavorful olive oil than I used.

I also got a bunch of little cucumbers, which I did the Indian treatment of (since it's quick and easy) and we took them and the eggplant dip to Tim's birthday party this afternoon. We helped put together a table for their backyard, and spent a long time blowing bubbles for the dogs to chase and eat. (Their pitbull would have chased them until she keeled over. So cute!)

I was thinking about doing something with the tomatoes, but instead I've just been eating them sliced with salt.

I got a great big head of purple cabbage to make into quick sauerkraut to make the sauerkraut-and-bratwurst casserole thing. A bunch of little apples went in there, too. I only used half of it for kraut (and burned a little onto the bottom of the pan, boo), so tonight I used the rest of it for Indian slaw. More popping mustard seeds in hot oil, yay!

I thought there was something else, but maybe it was just cooking myself breakfast this weekend.

Other stuff: Games Night Thursday; we played a cooperative WWI survival game called "The Grizzled" and managed to not die. Also a super-fast new version of Race for the Galaxy, which I liked. (I can't play the regular game non-virtually anymore, because about 70% of the time on turn 2 I can tell I'm going to lose...)

Municipal board meeting Wednesday. I have concluded that what I can best contribute to the group is detail-oriented impetus to actually get shit done rather than just talking about things forever and ever. I remember back in grad school hanging out with folks at the Ranch, and we'd decide that, yeah, food should probably happen, and then an unbounded discussion about where to get dinner would begin until either Karen or I (or sometimes both of us) would yell "Everybody get up! We're going! We're going now! Stand up! We are leaving the house to get food!" to get everybody moving. So now I get to do the same thing but for forming committees.

Roleplaying-focused Unmunchkin last Sunday, followed by a big dinner with Chris & Todd & friends downtown at Sam's #3. (They were in town to celebrate their anniversary, yay!)

Also, I trimmed off the muttonchops, so now I just have an underlip tuft and a long, long mustache. Walgreen's started selling Pinaud mustache wax again, so I have been waxing it every day. We'll see how long it lasts before I get fed up with it. Monkey trimmed off the wizard beard and is back to just the friendly muttonchops.

Weekend Update

Sep. 17th, 2017 08:57 pm
kybearfuzz: (Bill the Cat)
[personal profile] kybearfuzz
It's been a fairly active weekend, so here's a summary of everything that went on:

  • Friday I called the cable company and set up a repair visit. They could have done it over the weekend, but I have to take Wednesday off, so I scheduled it for then. And the repair will be free believe it or not. I still plan on giving the installer company a good chewing out. While it isn't costing me anything, the annoyance of being without cable in my bedroom for nearly two weeks has sucked


  • Saturday was a Cincinnati MovieBears outing to see "IT." It was a beautiful night and it was good see the guys. Everyone seemed to enjoy the movie, which I've now seen twice. I imagine that clowns will be a popular this Halloween.


  • Brian ([profile] cincycub) brought me a wonderful gift. While he was at Market Days this year, he bought me three issues of "How to Kill A Superhero," by Pablo Greene, autographed to me. According to the author's website, www.howtokillasuperhero.net, the novels tell the story of Roland, a young man who is changed forever by an occult book that grants its reader dangerous but seductive superpowers. It involves some superheroic bondage, which is very enticing. I was so thrilled with them, I hugged Brian twice. I look forward to reading them. The author is very much into superheroes, spandex, and singlets. I can relate :)


  • Sunday was mostly home stuff. I mowed the yard (by removing the boot and wearing the ankle guard), did laundry, and finished a retirement cartoon for a co-worker. It did wear me out a bit.


  • Tonight is the series finale of "The Strain." I'm curious to see how our heroes defeat the Strigoi (the vampires). It's been a very interesting show, with some cute leads. After the last season where Zach set off a nuke and gave the vampires reign over the world, I'm kind hoping he gets offed. I'll have to wait until tomorrow to watch it.


  • My next doctor's appointment is Wednesday. I sincerely hope I'm done with the boot. I need to get back into working out, as my lower body and mid-section are seriously out of shape.

70%

Sep. 24th, 2017 05:09 pm
christopher575: (Default)
[personal profile] christopher575
There was a nice piece in the paper recently about hikes and walks in the area, and it's pretty cool that I've been to seven of the ten listed, in italics below.

Paradise Valley
Lund’s Gulch
Big Gulch
Jetty Island

Scriber Lake
North Creek
Lord Hill

Portage Creek
Japanese Gulch
Spencer Island


Of the remaining three, Paradise Valley's the one I definitely need to see next. 13 miles of trails! I should really take my time and plan two separate walks there to see it all. The list also makes me want to visit Lord Hill again soon.

Snatched again

Sep. 17th, 2017 03:42 pm
christopher575: (Default)
[personal profile] christopher575
My weekly routine got all shuffled around so I ended up at the tank farm on Friday, with a plan to leave the Podo there all morning, go out for lunch, and pick it up in the afternoon.

20170915_055930

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[sci hist] A Most Remarkable Week

Sep. 17th, 2017 12:52 am
siderea: (Default)
[personal profile] siderea
(h/t Metafilter)

This link should take you to the audio player for The Moth, cued to a story, "Who Can You Trust", 12 minutes long.

The Moth, if you didn't know, is an organization that supports storytelling – solo spoken word prose – true stories. This story is told by Dr. Mary-Clare King, the discoverer of BRC1. It concerns a most extraordinary week in her life, when pretty much everything went absurdly wrong and right at all once. It is by turns appalling and amazing and touching and throughout hilarious.

It's worth hearing her tell herself before the live audience. But if you prefer transcript, that's here – but even the link is a spoiler.

Recommended.

(no subject)

Sep. 17th, 2017 06:45 am
bitterlawngnome: (Default)
[personal profile] bitterlawngnome


the Aspark Owl; 1396
© Bill Pusztai 2017

Well, I'm in Europe. Frankfurt right now. It's all a bit overwhelming, largely due to the jetlag which is really kicking my ass. We have completed shooting the auto show and spent some time yesterday sightseeing.


Frankfurt, pollarded sycamores by the river; 6350
© Bill Pusztai 2017

More later.

Nature's Lace

Sep. 16th, 2017 09:02 am
pink_halen: (Default)
[personal profile] pink_halen
It was a cool foggy morning when I went on a photography tour of Venice. I was grateful to have someone who knew where photogenic places were and wouldn't get lot which I had earlier in the week. This photo was taken at the Church of San Francisco (Chiesa di San Francesco della Vigna).



I have been fortunate to travel many places. Some of the places have been interesting while others have been spectacular. We visited some at just the right time. Now those places are in conflict or not safe to visit. Turkey is in turmoil. Egypt is dangerous. We saw Tunis before terrorists shot up the Bardo Museum. We visited Russia at a time when the US was less at odds with Moscow.

I wish all the places were as peaceful as this cloister in Venice.